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1.A.2.1.1
ATP-activated inward rectifier K+ channel, IRK1 (also called ROMK or KIR1.1) (regulated by Sur1, allowing ATP sensitivity; also activated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP) with affinity to PIP controlled by protein kinase A phosphorylation (which increases affinity for PIP) and protein kinase C phosphorylation (which decreases affinity for PIP (Zeng et al., 2003). A putative pH sensor has been identified (Rapedius et al. 2006). Alternariol (AOH), the most important mycotoxin produced by Alternaria species, which are the most common mycoflora infecting small grain cereals worldwide, causes loss of cell viability by inducing apoptosis. AOH-induced apoptosis through a mitochondria-dependent pathway is characterized by p53 activation, an opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), a downstream generation of O2- and caspase 9 and 3 activation (Bensassi et al., 2012). Pharmacological inhibition of renal ROMK causes diuresis and natriuresis in the absence of kaliuresis (Garcia et al. 2013).

Accession Number:P48048
Protein Name:ATP-sensitive inward rectifier potassium channel 1
Length:391
Molecular Weight:44795.00
Species:Homo sapiens (Human) [9606]
Number of TMSs:4
Location1 / Topology2 / Orientation3: Membrane1 / Multi-pass membrane protein2
Substrate K+

Cross database links:

Genevestigator: P48048
eggNOG: prNOG17688
HEGENOM: HBG716702
RefSeq: NP_000211.1    NP_722448.1    NP_722449.2    NP_722450.1    NP_722451.1   
Entrez Gene ID: 3758   
Pfam: PF01007   
Drugbank: Drugbank Link   
OMIM: 241200  phenotype
600359  gene
KEGG: hsa:3758   

Gene Ontology

GO:0008076 C:voltage-gated potassium channel complex
GO:0005524 F:ATP binding
GO:0005242 F:inward rectifier potassium channel activity
GO:0007588 P:excretion
GO:0006813 P:potassium ion transport

References (9)

[1] “Cloning and characterization of multiple forms of the human kidney ROM-K potassium channel.”  Shuck M.E.et.al.   7929082
[2] “Alternative splicing of human inwardly rectifying K+ channel ROMK1 mRNA.”  Yano H.et.al.   8190102
[3] “Nucleotide sequence analysis of the human KCNJ1 potassium channel locus.”  Bock J.H.et.al.   9099852
[4] “The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).”  The MGC Project Teamet.al.   15489334
[5] “Isolation and chromosomal localization of a human ATP-regulated potassium channel.”  Krishnan S.N.et.al.   7635463
[6] “Genetic heterogeneity of Bartter's syndrome revealed by mutations in the K+ channel, ROMK.”  Simon D.B.et.al.   8841184
[7] “Mutations in the gene encoding the inwardly-rectifying renal potassium channel, ROMK, cause the antenatal variant of Bartter syndrome: evidence for genetic heterogeneity.”  Karolyi L.et.al.   9002665
[8] “A hyperprostaglandin E syndrome mutation in Kir1.1 (renal outer medullary potassium) channels reveals a crucial residue for channel function in Kir1.3 channels.”  Derst C.et.al.   9727001
[9] “The consensus coding sequences of human breast and colorectal cancers.”  Sjoeblom T.et.al.   16959974

External Searches:

  • Search: DB with
  • BLAST ExPASy (Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) BLAST)
  • CDD Search (Conserved Domain Database)
  • Search COGs (Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins)
  • 2° Structure (Network Protein Sequence Analysis)

Analyze:

Predict TMSs (Predict number of transmembrane segments)
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FASTA formatted sequence
1:	MNASSRNVFD TLIRVLTESM FKHLRKWVVT RFFGHSRQRA RLVSKDGRCN IEFGNVEAQS 
61:	RFIFFVDIWT TVLDLKWRYK MTIFITAFLG SWFFFGLLWY AVAYIHKDLP EFHPSANHTP 
121:	CVENINGLTS AFLFSLETQV TIGYGFRCVT EQCATAIFLL IFQSILGVII NSFMCGAILA 
181:	KISRPKKRAK TITFSKNAVI SKRGGKLCLL IRVANLRKSL LIGSHIYGKL LKTTVTPEGE 
241:	TIILDQININ FVVDAGNENL FFISPLTIYH VIDHNSPFFH MAAETLLQQD FELVVFLDGT 
301:	VESTSATCQV RTSYVPEEVL WGYRFAPIVS KTKEGKYRVD FHNFSKTVEV ETPHCAMCLY 
361:	NEKDVRARMK RGYDNPNFIL SEVNETDDTK M